Jody Williams

Jody Williams received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for her work to ban landmines through the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. Williams continues to be recognized for her contributions to human rights and global security. She is the recipient of fifteen honorary degrees, among other recognitions. In 2004, Williams was named by Forbes Magazine as one of the 100 most powerful women in the world in the publication of its first such annual list.

She holds the Sam and Cele Keeper Endowed Professorship in Peace and Social Justice at the Graduate College of Social Work at the University of Houston where she has been teaching since 2003. In academic year 2012-2013, she became the inaugural Jane Addams Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Social Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Book titles in collaboration with Idea Architects

  • My Name is Jody Williams: A Vermont Girl's Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize

Press Features & Reviews

Doug recalls: "Jody won the Nobel Peace Prize for her tireless effort to ban land mines and rather famously called Bill Clinton a "weeny" for not signing it. She is a straight-talking, no-holds-barred global hero, and her memoir is equally honest, powerful, and inspiring. The everywoman’s Nobel Laureate, Jody Williams shows that you don’t have to be Mother Teresa to win the peace prize and change the world. In this raw and powerful memoir, Williams shares the story of her sometimes rough and always unexpected path, from defending the weak against bullies in a tiny town in Vermont to launching a breakthrough global grassroots campaign that banned landmines around the world."

She is a straight-talking, no-holds-barred global hero, and her memoir is equally honest, powerful, and inspiring. "